More catching up – pictures to follow

We’ve seen so much since I took the time to really get in depth about the ports on this trip, that now that we have a few sea days, I thought I’d take the time to share some of the things we’ve learned along the way about this part of the world. I’ll go back to the beginning of this itinerary and start with Bergen.

 

Bergen is one of the larger cities in Norway, and has a long history as a sea port, fishing port and trading city. The oldest part of the city is around the old port and there you can find the remains of a medieval fort, the Bergenhus Fortress and King Haakon’s Hall which houses a well-preserved medieval tapestry. Near these are the wooden buildings – some original, some reconstructed – that served as warehouses, shops, and homes for the merchants of the Hanseatic League, and the Schotstuene, a medieval assembly hall. Together this area is called the Bryggen Waterfront and it is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Adjacent to the Bryggen is the famous Fish Market, now selling prepared food, arts and crafts and tourist trinkets as well as fish, and about a block away from this area is the entry to the funicular that goes to the top of Mt. Floyen. This is one of the most popular attractions in Bergen, at least in clear weather, as it affords a panoramic view of the harbor and the city. There is also a café, gift shop, playground and a network of hiking trails at the summit. Outside of town, reachable by bus, on tour, or by taxi, you can find the summer home of Edward Grieg, Troldhaugen, and a replica of a stave church, the Fantoft Stavechurch. The original burned down in 1992.

Rare thing -sunshine in Bergen
Rare thing -sunshine in Bergen
Bergen, Caribbean Princess from Mt Floyen
Bergen, Caribbean Princess from Mt Floyen
Isafjordur
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Sign for an art supply store across the street, Bergen
Sign for an art supply store across the street, Bergen
Church in Bergen
Church in Bergen

 

From Bergen, we cruised almost due west, to Lerwick in the Shetland Islands. The Shetlands are a part of Scotland, but are actually closer to Norway than to Scotland, and were a part of Norway and the Danish Empire before becoming a part of Scotland when they were ceded to the Scottish king as part of the dowry of his Viking bride. Said to be more Norse than Scottish in heritage, the Shetlands are home to a number of festivals, chief among which is the Up Helly A, a fire festival which takes place annually on the last Tuesday of January. A longboat replica is built, then burned after a torchlit procession through the streets. A gallery/museum showing the costumes, photos and videos of past celebrations is in downtown Lerwick, and there is a website as well – www.uphellyaa.org Other indicators of the strong Norse connections are found in the place names which borrow heavily from Old Norse – endings such as ‘sta’, Ulsta, Tresta come from the Old Norse ‘setr’ a summer pasture for cattle, ‘tun’ or ‘toon’ come from ‘tun’ a township, ayre – a sandy or gravelly bank, from the Old Norse eyrr – there are many more including ‘dale’ for valley, ‘wart’ and ‘ward’ for watch tower, and ‘ness’ for a headland, and ‘ting’ from the Old Norse for an assembly place, part of the system of administration and justice. But even before the Vikings arrived some 1,000 years ago, the Shetlands had long been inhabited, with the first settlers arriving from the south, making their way slowly northward from one visible island to the next, arriving in the Shetlands something like 6,000 to 7,000 years ago. The Jarlshof site contains six main levels of habitation, some going back to the Neolithic period, perhaps as much as 5,000 to 6,000 years ago, and including an Iron Age broch (round stone tower) and ‘wheel houses – stone structures in the shape of a wheel, with the spokes defining living, sleeping, and work spaces; the remains of Viking longhouses and village buildings, including a forge, a medieval farmstead, and the remains of the laird’s house, from around 1600 for which the site was named by Walter Scott in The Pirate. Other archeological sites include Mousa Broch, a 2,000 year old Iron Age tower, and St. Ninian’s Isle, home of a tiny Celtic chapel from around 800 AD. Other points of interest in learning about the history and way of life in the Shetlands are the Crofthouse Museum, a homestead restored to what it would have been like in the late 1800s, including the barn and byre, home-made furnishings, and home and farm tools and implements. Nearby is the restored Quendale Mill, a water mill providing grinding of grains for the surrounding farms. Both provide a glimpse into the bygone era of subsistence farming.

Shetland coast
Shetland coast
coastal area, Shetland
coastal area, Shetland
Shetland
Shetland
crofter's house
crofter’s house
Jarlshof site - wheel house dwelling
Jarlshof site – wheel house dwelling
Shetland
Shetland
Shetland pony
Shetland pony
croft house, Shetland
croft house, Shetland
Shetlands
Shetlands

IMG_1574 IMG_1592 IMG_1604

Jarlshof
Jarlshof
Jarlshof, Shetland
Jarlshof, Shetland
Jarlshof - part of Viking Longhouse foundations
Jarlshof – part of Viking Longhouse foundations
Jarlshof
Jarlshof

 

From Shetland, we made our way northward, crossing over the Arctic Circle to visit Iceland. With three stops in Iceland, we also had a nightly watch for the Northern Lights, and at least some of the passengers managed to see them on three different nights. Personally, I only managed one sighting, which was also the least spectacular, but still, I did get to see them. Most of the time, the activity level was low to moderate, and the weather was cold and overcast, so the glimpses were few and generally, quite late at night – the best one was at around 1 AM on the night we left our first port of call, Akureyri. I had given up the watch about 11 PM after a long day of sightseeing. Akureyri is the largest town in the north of Iceland, with a population around 18,000. It was established by the Vikings in the 9th century, and officially chartered in 1786.   Points of interest in Akureyri are the Godafoss Waterfall, the waterfall of the gods, so named because a Viking chief who had converted to Christianity threw his images of Odin and Thor into the waterfall to prove his new faith, Lake Myvatn, and Myvatn Nature Baths – natural geothermal spring mineral baths, and the Namaskard geothermal area with boiling mud pools and steam vents.

Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Akureyri
Akureyri
Akureyri
Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
farmstead, countryside around Akureyri
farmstead, countryside around Akureyri
thermal pool Akureyri
thermal pool Akureyri
Troll rocks (this one looks like a squirrel to me)
Troll rocks (this one looks like a squirrel to me)
troll rock formaitons, Akureyri
troll rock formaitons, Akureyri
troll rock park, Akureyri
troll rock park, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
lichens and wildflowers, Akureyri
lichens and wildflowers, Akureyri
lava formations, Akureyri
lava formations, Akureyri
troll rock formations, Akureyri
troll rock formations, Akureyri

Isafjordur, our next port in Iceland, was created from several smaller communities in 1997, and was a fishing port until the fisheries began to fail and quotas were imposed.  Today it is largely an administrative center with about as many people employed in civil service as in fisheries, about 20% each, with the remaining jobs mostly in the service and commerce sectors.  Tourism is a minor part of the economy and mostly concentrated in wildlife, particularly birding on Vidur island, home to thousands of birds of many species, and five people.

residential area Isafjordur
residential area Isafjordur
home, Isafjordur
home, Isafjordur
former hospital, now cultural center, Isafjordur
former hospital, now cultural center, Isafjordur
memorial to fishermen, Isafjordure
memorial to fishermen, Isafjordure
mural, Isafjordur
mural, Isafjordur
Peace mural, Isafjordur, from 2014 festival
Peace mural, Isafjordur, from 2014 festival
Caribbean Princess - harbor, Isafjordur
Caribbean Princess – harbor, Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Kirken, Isafjordur
Kirken, Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Isafjordur

 

Catchup

Since I was last able to post, we’ve been to Shetland, Akureyri, and are now in Isafjordur.  In Shetland, the highlight of the trip (for me, not so much for Dennis) was a visit to the archeological site at Jarlshof.  7000 years of more or less continuous occupation, from the Neolithic period through the 19th century, with well preserved and well presented examples of housing and buildings from each period – pretty amazing.  We also got to see a preserved crofter’s cottage – a marvel in space utilization and recycling – a small boat past its prime as a seaworthy vessel was used to make a roof for a storage shed, and old fishing nets were used to hold down the thatch weighted with stones (very windy in the Shetlands.)

From there, we had a sea day and then called in Akureyri, close to the Arctic circle in Iceland.  Our guide there was a part timer who also was a local police officer and a soccer coach.  Since the Icelandic currency collapsed a few years back it has become harder and harder for people to maintain their standard of living.  We visited waterfalls, thermal areas, and a set of lava formations that were supposed to be the home of trolls – it is pretty easy to see why people thought that was the case when you start to look for the faces and shapes in the rock formations.

Today we are in Isafjordur, a remote fishing village in the West Fjords area and, while it must be a spectacular sight when there is snow everywhere, it is, frankly, pretty bleak just now.  The primary attraction is a small hut near the tender dock where the locals provide free internet to the cruise ship passengers and crew.  It is pretty crowded here, but it is about the only place in town where there are many people.  The primary attractions here are out of town, an offshore island that is home to thousands of birds of several species, including the national bird of Iceland, the puffin, and the Arctic tern.  I’m just going to grab all the pictures from the last few days that I haven’t been able to load and throw them in here.  I’ll add some captions and whatnot when I get home, but I did want to share some of what we had seen over the last few days while I had the chance.  I’d do more now, but it is not heated in this hut and it is getting pretty chilly (high today is supposed to get to 52 F

So, here are a random assortment of pictures from Bergen, Shetland, Akureyri and Isafjordur – and as soon as they load and the post is up, we’re back to the nice warm ship!  Enjoy!

 

thermal pool Akureyri
thermal pool Akureyri

IMG_1604

Godafoss, Akureyr
Godafoss, Akureyr
Jarlshof
Jarlshof
Jarlshof
Jarlshof
crofter's house, Shetland
crofter’s house, Shetland
seals, Shetland
seals, Shetland
Jarlshof
Jarlshof
Jarlshof - part of Viking Longhouse foundations
Jarlshof – part of Viking Longhouse foundations
Shetland
Shetland
Shetland
Shetland
seals on beach Shetland
seals on beach Shetland
Fishing vessel headed home, Bergen
Fishing vessel headed home, Bergen
Leaving Bergen
Leaving Bergen
Jarlshof, Shetland
Jarlshof, Shetland
Bergen
Bergen
Bergen, Caribbean Princess from Mt Floyen
Bergen, Caribbean Princess from Mt Floyen
Akureyri
Akureyri
Rare thing -sunshine in Bergen
Rare thing -sunshine in Bergen
Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Sign for an art supply store across the street, Bergen
Sign for an art supply store across the street, Bergen
Bergen
Bergen
Akureyri
Akureyri
Bergen
Bergen
Church in Bergen
Church in Bergen
rock formations, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
Shetland coast
Shetland coast
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
crofter's house
crofter’s house
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Godafoss waterfall, Akureyri
Shetland
Shetland
coastal area, Shetland
coastal area, Shetland
Shetland pony
Shetland pony
farmstead, countryside around Akureyri
farmstead, countryside around Akureyri
Shetland
Shetland
Jarlshof site - wheel house dwelling
Jarlshof site – wheel house dwelling
Troll rocks (this one looks like a squirrel to me)
Troll rocks (this one looks like a squirrel to me)
Shetlands
Shetlands
croft house, Shetland
croft house, Shetland
thermal pool Akureyri
thermal pool Akureyri
Bergen, fountains
Bergen, fountains
Bergen looking down from Mt. Floyd
Bergen looking down from Mt. Floyd
troll rock formaitons, Akureyri
troll rock formaitons, Akureyri
troll rock park, Akureyri
troll rock park, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
rock formations, Akureyri
Shetland coast
Shetland coast
sunset at sea
sunset at sea
troll rocks, Akureyri
troll rocks, Akureyri
lichens and wildflowers, Akureyri
lichens and wildflowers, Akureyri
Arrival, Akureyri
Arrival, Akureyri
lava formations, Akureyri
lava formations, Akureyri
former hospital, now cultural center, Isafjordur
former hospital, now cultural center, Isafjordur
home, Isafjordur
home, Isafjordur
residential area Isafjordur
residential area Isafjordur
troll rock formations, Akureyri
troll rock formations, Akureyri
memorial to fishermen, Isafjordure
memorial to fishermen, Isafjordure
mural, Isafjordur
mural, Isafjordur
Peace mural, Isafjordur, from 2014 festival
Peace mural, Isafjordur, from 2014 festival
Caribbean Princess - harbor, Isafjordur
Caribbean Princess – harbor, Isafjordur
fountain, Bergen
fountain, Bergen
Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Kirken, Isafjordur
Kirken, Isafjordur
Isafjordur
Isafjordur

IMG_1549

1929 Ford used as a bakery delivery truck, Isafjordur
1929 Ford used as a bakery delivery truck, Isafjordur
Old hotel building, Isafjordur
Old hotel building, Isafjordur
Floral pavillion, Bergen
Floral pavillion, Bergen

On Board and headed to Bergen

There won’t be pictures until I can get to a land based, free, and faster internet connection – sorry! This one is just too slow and takes way to long to upload pictures.

Our stay in Southampton was uneventful, the Premier West Quay was functional and well located, if not the comfort level we had become accustomed to in the Lakes. Embarkation was reasonably quick although the security boarding the ship was similar to clearing airport security – jackets off laptops out and so on – and we were on board by one and had our luggage shortly thereafter and I spent the afternoon in the Laundromat, and we are now set for a while.

Our aft cabin is spacious and well designed, loads of storage room and we are being well looked after by our room steward Sommart from Thailand. As soon as the luggage arrived, I unpacked, got us settled in for the duration and, of course, headed to the laundry. We weren’t the only ones who had been traveling for a while prior to reaching the ship and the laundry room proved to be a popular spot. I met several couples from our corridor and one lady from the deck above while waiting for my wash to finish and then to get a dryer. By the time I had secured a dryer, it was time for the emergency muster drill, so I got an extra token to put in to be sure the dryer would run until I could get back to it and off we went. Muster drills are taken a lot more seriously in the post-Concordia era and people were more attentive than we have seen them be in the past, although there were still a number of names called out as having either missed the ship or the drill or both – it wasn’t clear. In any event, we missed our departure window for one reason or another and were delayed leaving Southampton by two hours due to harbor and channel traffic.

Our first sea day has been leisurely, but very rough. We had the Cruise Critic roll call get together – it looked like we had well over 100 people in attendance and the roll call numbered over 200. After that we introduced ourselves to the casino for a while (up .09 on the day!) and then had lunch and met some very nice folks from the Midwest and South Carolina, and I went to the spa for a manicure since tonight was a formal night, and the trip and hauling of luggage for these past weeks had left my poor hands looking pretty rough. We both got ourselves all dressed up for the evening – Dennis looking very sharp, indeed, in his tux. We are in the main dining room and at fixed seating for the first time on this trip. It is a little rigid, having to be at the dining room at 6 PM, but there are no lines and we have a very nice table for two, which we enjoyed and very pleasant older gal from Romania as our server, so I think it will work out fine.

The Captain’s Welcome party has been significantly scaled back since our early cruise days when you could order pretty much anything you wanted to drink during the hour or so party. Now it is not very high quality champagne or nothing.  I had a glass and Dennis passed on it after asking for a glass of white wine from the server and being told if he didn’t want the champagne to go to the bar and order something.

Stopped in to hear a very funny Irish comedian who had been the headliner last night (we called it a night early last night and, unfortunately, missed his first show) and then headed back to the cabin to get Dennis out of his tux. Since it is so rough – to the point of being a little hard to walk –  we decided on another early evening. Our arrival tomorrow in Bergen will be pushed back by two hours, and the departure will be only one hour later, so I guess we are going to make up the time between Bergen and Shetland. Hopefully, it won’t be quite as bumpy as the North Sea is being right now.

We don’t have anything specific planned for Bergen, preferring to wait and see what the weather turns out like, as we’ve had brilliant sunny weather there one time and rain pouring in buckets on our last visit. Our first scheduled excursion is in Shetland and we met up with the organizer of that one today after the Cruise Critic meet and greet. Fingers crossed that the weather genie we’ve had for most of the trip will return to us and give us a sunny day in Bergen and decent weather in Shetland as well.

Blackwell House

Our objective for today – our last in the Lake District – was to visit Blackwell House, an historic Arts and Crafts home completed in 1901 for Sir Edward Holt, a prosperous brewery owner from Manchester, as a summer home. Designed by Mackay Baillie Scott, a prominent Arts and Crafts architect and designer, who was influenced by William Morris and John Ruskin, Scott also supervised the decorating.  He incorporated the Rowan leaf and berry pattern in many of the decorative details, taking the theme from the Holt family crest.  Most of the architectural detail miraculously survived and is original.

This place appears to still be in private hands - on the road on between Bowness and Blackwell House
This place appears to still be in private hands – on the road on between Bowness and Blackwell House
Maze hedge in the gardens of the big pink manor
Maze hedge in the gardens of the big pink manor

The house lies just outside Bowness, above the Lake and commands lovely views from both inside and outside the house. The house is not on any public transportation route, so we walked the mile and half between our hotel and Blackwell House. Most of the walk was fine, but there are some unnerving bits where not only is there no sidewalk, there isn’t even a shoulder on either side of the road, so we spent a fair bit of time pressed up agains the characteristic slate walls as traffic whizzed by. People walk all over here, so it was surprising to find no pathways along this stretch of road.

The walk brought us by a large number of holiday rentals, bed and breakfast establishments and stately homes that have been converted to hotels and B & Bs. We also saw one that seemed to be still in private hands that was quite spectacular, featuring its own shrubbery maze.

Blackwell House has had quite an interesting history, serving the Holts as a vacation home until World War II when it housed a relocated girl’s school, and it served as a school until the mid-1970s when it went back into private ownership before being purchased by the Lakeland Arts charity in the late 1990s who then undertook the restoration of the interior, preserving the original Arts and Crafts detailing, cleaning and restoring the home and obtaining furniture and objects from the period to give a sense of what the house would have contained in its heyday.

Blackwell
Blackwell

 

 

One of a large number of window seats and nooks framing the views
One of a large number of window seats and nooks framing the views
Another of the nooks
Another of the nooks
Another nook, another view
Another nook, another view
View from one of the nooks
View from yet another one of the nooks
When the house became a girls school from the 1940s to the 1970s this room sometimes served as the gym
When the house became a girls school from the 1940s to the 1970s this room sometimes served as the gym but originally the billiard table sat where the table is now
Detail of hand made copper lamps that hung above the billiard table
Detail of hand made copper lamps that hung above the billiard table
Detail from one of the Arts and Crafts chests
Detail from one of the Arts and Crafts chests
Stain glass between hall and great room
Stained glass between hall and great room
Peacocks hand painted on 'hessian' - a linen like cloth and used as wall paper
Peacocks hand painted on ‘hessian’ – a linen like cloth and used as wall paper
Fireplace in the 'White Drawing Room'
Fireplace in the ‘White Drawing Room’
Acorn shaped ash receptacle at fireplace
Acorn shaped ash receptacle at fireplace in great room

 

 

 

 

View from the front of Blackwell House
View from the front of Blackwell House

By the time we had walked there, spent time exploring the house (and the wonderful tempting gift shop – so many gorgeous things and no room in the luggage…sigh…) and then walked back to Bowness, the weather had really started to turn chilly and overcast, so we headed back to the hotel. Soon I will have to do the dreaded packing up for our next phase, the train trip to Southampton and our transatlantic cruise towards home which will start on Saturday. I think from here on out we are going to be going from cool to cooler until we get back to the US later in September. I’m really regretting not picking up one of the cashmere sweaters I saw on sale for 39 Euro back in Germany…but – no room in the luggage there either…

Further Afield

Scenery on the way to Keswick
Scenery on the way to Keswick

 

Our adventures in public transportation continued today as we utilized our Explorer bus passes again.  Our objective for the day was Keswick.  Along the way we saw gorgeous scenery, lots of sheep, stately homes and loads of hiking paths across and up the many hills and fells.

More scenery
More scenery

 

IMG_1440
Miller Howe Cafe just outside Grasmere

Our first stop of the day was in Grasmere, the home of William Wordsworth and also the site of his grave. Gasmere is a beautiful spot and we had a nice time wandering on the public footpath along the stream and strolling around the town.

Williams Wordworth's gravestone, Grasmere Churchyard
Williams Wordworth’s gravestone, Grasmere Churchyard
Field along the public footpath in Grasmere
Field along the public footpath in Grasmere
IMG_1431
Typical slate wall along the public pathway in Grasmere
Grasmere St. Oswald's Church
Grasmere St. Oswald’s Church

 

We then reboarded our Stagecoach bus and headed for Keswick (pronounced Kes-ick) which is the largest of the towns we’ve visited here in the Lake District. It is located on the Derwentwater Lake and is quite a busy town with a lot of walkers using it as a starting point for the numerous hikes and walks originating nearby. It is also quite close to a neolithic stone circle at Castle Rigg, but, unfortunately, it had started to rain by the time we started back and our bus reached the stop for that so we passed on doing the hike out there.

Keswick
Keswick
Some of the many well behaved dogs out with their people
Some of the many well-behaved dogs out with their people

We returned to Windermere, checked in at the railway station there to see about our best options for our trip to Southampton on Friday. By then it had cleared up so we decided to walk home from Windermere to Bowness – about a mile or mile and a half, but pretty much all downhill so it was a nice walk and there are so many pretty houses and businesses with gorgeous plantings and hanging flower baskets and boxes.

 

One of the Windermere B & Bs
One of the Windermere B & Bs
Windermere flower boxes
Windermere flower boxes

The end of another pleasant day in the Lake District was crowned by a gorgeous sunset! Tomorrow we are planning to walk out to a place called Blackwood – an Arts and Crafts home now open as a museum.  It is supposed to be about a mile or so away from the hotel here and if the weather is good we will do it.  We asked about getting there on the bus, but is isn’t on any of the bus lines so it is walk or take a cab.

Sunset over the harbor at Bowness
Sunset over the harbor at Bowness
Sunset at Bowness
Sunset at Bowness

 

 

Exploring Lake Windermere

After getting the laundry done – I should note that we are traveling for 37 days with one 21″ case each, so laundry is just a fact of life on this trip-and resting up, we went out looking for a pub to have dinner.  Not finding any that were open and had any room (Bank Holiday) we ended up in a side street Chinese place that turned out to be a good choice – very tasty and not too expensive.

Today we decided to explore the Lake itself with a day ticket on the lake cruises boats.  We started out with a trip from the Bowness pier to Brockhole, the Lake District information center and activity center.

 

Looking up the lake from rail of the Teal on our way to Brockhole
Looking up the lake from rail of the Teal on our way to Brockhole

 

 

We’ve noticed on prior trips in the U.K. that it is very dog friendly (and that the dogs are amazingly quiet and well-behaved – unlike a certain pair of Papillons I could mention!) but today was amazing – at least 25% of the people we saw walking around  and many on the lake boats as well, were with their dogs.  We met an adorable King Charles spaniel/beagle mix, a foxhound named Albert, and an aging Rottweiler on board various legs of our lake tour today.

 

IMG_1343
Brockhole Lake District Visitor’s Center

 

Brockhole is a large former home or manor that has been converted into an information center, cafe, and activity center and draws many families for a huge play area, and a ‘tree walk’ – suspended walkway – leading to a small zipline.  There are extensive grounds and gardens as well and a gift shop and tourist information center for the whole Lake District.

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Slate wall from the garden
IMG_1340
Esplanaded fruit trees on south-facing walls in the gardens

There are formal and informal gardens as well as a kitchen garden and all sorts of walls, made of the typical slate that is the most common building material in this region, walkways and tucked away vista points with benches and seats.  It makes for a lovely place to spend a bit of time stretching your legs after being on the boats.  There is a fairly large cafe/restaurant and a number of areas both indoor and outside to sit and enjoy your snack or meal.

IMG_1330
All kinds of ‘Secret Garden’ type corners in the Brockhole Gardens

After wandering around the gardens and grounds and watching folks doing the zip line, we returned to the pier and continued up the lake to Ambleside to change over to the boat that took us up the other side of the lake and all the way down to Lakeside.  During the hour or so that this took the weather went from brisk but sunny, to windy and cloudy, to dark threatening clouds to a fairly violent rainstorm which then turned into a thunderstorm with hail.  This drove everyone into the rather confined indoor quarters at least for a short time.  We were soon out of the storm and by the time we were back at Bowness, it was dry again, although still cool and overcast.  We took a stroll through town to find our dining spot for tonight – we’re hoping for the Village Pub, as the crowds are thinned down today.

Weather starting to brew up on the Lake
Weather starting to brew up on the Lake
All kinds of weather on the Lake today - sunshine to thunder and hail!
All kinds of weather on the Lake today – sunshine to thunder and hail!